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Rock Properties Vary with Fossils Found in Them

Copyright 2003 G.R. Morton  This can be freely distributed so long as no changes are made and no charges are made.

Tonights reason that the global flood isn't workable comes from a comparison of the fossils found in the rock and the physical properties of that rock. We all know about index fossils Trilobites are found in Cambrian through Permian rocks. Certain Conodonts are found only in particular periods of the Cambrian and Ordovician but never anywhere else. Index fossils will be listed below the picture.

If all the rocks were deposited in a one year period, we should expect that the compaction (the amount of particle packing, should vary only by depth. It really shouldn't matter what fossils are in it. A Devonian (400 million year old) sandstone on the surface is as young as a Pleistocene (3 million year old). Thus we should expect that they should have similar physical properties, like porosity, speed of sound etc.

As a rock compacts, the rock grains are in greater contact and thus, the rock transmits sound waves faster as it compacts. Compaction occurs for two reasons. First is depth of burial in which the weight of the overlying sediments presses down on the rock making the grains be more in contact with each other. The second form of compaction comes with age. Normal processes cause the grains to become more in contact with each other over time. It is what causes settling in a new house build on land fill. Over time, the rock grains compact.

What we find is that regardless of the depth of the rock, rocks which are older (contain the oldest fossils, transmit sound faster than the younger rocks. This simply shouldn't be the case if the global flood were the cause of the sediments. Devonian sands on the surface are always faster than Pliocene sands on the surface. It is as if the Devonian rocks are older. Below is a chart of this phenomenon taken from A. R. Gregory "Rock
Physics in Seismic Interpretation," in Charles Payton Ed. Seismic Stratigraphy applications to hydrocarbon Exploration, AAPG Memoir 26, p. 19

Please explain why rocks which are older have a faster velocity, are more compacted, are more lithified and are harder?

Index fossils 
conodonts Cambrian
Late Cambrian
Taridontus nakamurai
Proconodontus muelleri
Granatodontus ani
Hispidodontus resimus
Eoconodontus notchpeakensis
Hirsutodontus nodus
Hispidodontus appressus
Hispidodontus discretus
Eodentatus bicuspatus
Cordylodus primitivus
Fryxellodontus inornatus

Datsonian (Late Cambrian or Early Ordovician

Hirsutodontus hirsutus
Cordylodus proavus
Clavohamulus elongatus
Hirsutodontus simplex
Clavohamulus hintzei
monocostodus sevierensis
Utahconus utahensis
Cordylodus Caboi
Cordylodus prolindstromi

Warendian Lower Ordiovician

Cordylodus lindstromi
Variabiliconus bassleri
cordylodus angulatus
Clavohamulus sp. nov. A
Cordylodus caseyi
Chosonodina herfurthi
rossodous manitouensis
Acanthodus costatus
Iapetognatthus sp.
Clavohamulus sp. nov. B
~ John H. Shergold and Robert S. Nicoll, "Revised Cambrian-Ordovician Boundary Biostratigraphy, Black Moutnain Western Queensland," in Webby and Laurie eds. Global Perspectives on Ordovician Geology, (Rotterdam:Balkema, 1992), pp 81-92, p. 84
**
Middle Lower Ordovician boundary Ibexian is Lower Whiterockian is middle

Ibexian Lower Ordovician index
conodonts
Drepanoistodus forceps
Paltodus sweeti
Oepilkodus communis
Scolopodus rex
Reutteroidus andinus
Eucharodus parallelus
Scandodus americanus
Juanagnathus variabilis
Tropodus australis
Parapanderodus striatus
Drepanodus arcuatus
Bergstroemognathus extensus
Oepikodus evae
Stolodus stola
Acodus emanuelensis

Middle Ordovician
Histodella altifrons minutiserrata
Pteracontiodus
Scandodus robustus
Walliserodus ethingtoni
Paltodus jentlandicus lofgren
Paroistodus originalis
Amsella jemtlandicus
Tripodus laevis
Orthambonites marshalli
Histiodella sinosa
Ectenonotus whittingtoni
Histiodella serrata
Periodon aculeata
~ Reuben J. Ross Jr. and Raymond L. Ethington, "North American Whiterock Series Suited for Global Correlation," in Webby and Laurie eds. Global Perspectives on Ordovician Geology, (Rotterdam:Balkema, 1992), pp 135-152, p. 137

**
Brachiopods middle ordovician
Idiostrophia conciliata
Idiostrophia nuda
Orthidium fimbriatum
Ingria cloudi
Liricamera nevadensis
Petroria austrina
Orthidium bellulum
Pleurorthis beattyensis
Cuparius cardilatus
Orthambonites minusculus
Idiostrophia valdari
Idiostrophia lenticularis
anomalorthis lambda
phragmorthis antiqua
Blastoidocrinus elongatus
Blastoidocrinus nevadensis
Orthidiella longwelli
Orthidiella costellata
Atelelasma primotica
Hesperorthis antelopensis
Ptychopleurella kelinhampli
Leptellina occidentalis
Valcourea plana
leptellina occidentalis
~ Reuben J. Ross Jr. and Raymond L. Ethington, "North American Whiterock Series Suited for Global Correlation," in Webby and Laurie eds. Global Perspectives on Ordovician Geology, (Rotterdam:Balkema, 1992), pp 135-152, p. 139
**
Middle Ordovician trilobites
"Carolinites killaryensis
Kawina wilsoni
Mileus worutator
Endymionia meeki
Xystrocrania pyriformis
Illaemus auriculatus
Carolinites genacinaca
Heliomera albata
Apatolichas juleieei
Carolinites angustagena
bathyurellus feitieri
Ectenonotus whittingtoni
Protocalymens acallesteri
Illaenus auriculatus
Pliomerops canadensis
~ Reuben J. Ross Jr. and Raymond L. Ethington, "North American Whiterock Series Suited for Global Correlation," in Webby and Laurie eds. Global Perspectives on Ordovician Geology, (Rotterdam:Balkema, 1992), pp 135-152, p. 140


In the Permian, certain sponges are index fossils

index fossils
Lower Permian genus's
Paramblysiphonella

Middle Permian genera

Guadalupia
Vuothalamia

Upper Permian genera

Amphorithalamia
Apocoelia
Glomocystospongia
Pisothalamia
Polyedra
Pseudoamblysiphonella
Spica
Subascosymplegma
Tristratocoelia
~ J. K. Rigbey and B. Senowbari-Daryan, "Permian Sponge Biogeography and Biostratigraphy," Petroleum Abstract 652,700, p. 162

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